Volume 2, Issue 3, June 2014, Page: 55-59
Chemical Composition, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of the Essential oil of Pinus Patula Growing in Rwanda
Tomani Jean Claude, Research Program in Phytomedecine and Life Science, Institute of Scientific and Technological Research, Huye, Rwanda
Murangwa Christine, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, National University of Rwanda, Huye, Rwanda
Bajyana Songa, Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science, National University of Rwanda, Huye, Rwanda
Mukazayire Marie Jeanne, Research Program in Phytomedecine and Life Science, Institute of Scientific and Technological Research, Huye, Rwanda
Ingabire Mukazi Goretti, Research Program in Phytomedecine and Life Science, Institute of Scientific and Technological Research, Huye, Rwanda
Chalchat Jean Claude, Laboratory of Photochemistry Molecular and Macromolecular, Chemistry of Essential Oils, Blaise Pascal Clermont University, Aubière Cédex, France
Received: May 12, 2014;       Accepted: Jun. 5, 2014;       Published: Jun. 20, 2014
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20140203.11      View  3322      Downloads  220
Abstract
Essential oils and their components are increasingly spreading as naturally occurring antimicrobial agents. In this work the chemical composition and the antimicrobial properties of Pinus patula essential oils, a wild Pinaceae, which grows in several regions of Rwanda, were characterized and assessed. The essential oil was obtained by steam distillation and the chemical composition was determined using GC/MS. The in vitro antimicrobial activity of the essential oil was studied against two Gram-negative bacteria (Streptococcus pyogenis, Pseudomonas solanacearum) and one Gram-positive bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus) and two fungi (Pycularia oryzae, Colletotrichum coffeanum) using a broth macrodilution method and by agar diffusion method. During the chemical composition analysis, seventy-four components making up 99.11% of the oil were detected while only fifty components making up 95.70% of the oil were characterized, β-phellandrene (18.98%), α-pinene (15.91%), bornyl acetate (7.89%), β-caryophyllene (7.41%), limonene (5.67%) being the major constituents. The results of the in vitro antimicrobial assay showed that essential oil extracted from the rwandese Pinus patula has a strong activity against all tested bacteria and fungi, exception done to Colletotrichum coffeanum fungi.
Keywords
Essential Oil, Pinus Patula, Rwanda, Chemical Composition, Antimicrobial Activity
To cite this article
Tomani Jean Claude, Murangwa Christine, Bajyana Songa, Mukazayire Marie Jeanne, Ingabire Mukazi Goretti, Chalchat Jean Claude, Chemical Composition, Antibacterial and Antifungal Activity of the Essential oil of Pinus Patula Growing in Rwanda, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 2, No. 3, 2014, pp. 55-59. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20140203.11
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