Volume 7, Issue 1, February 2019, Page: 10-15
Investigation of Antibacterial Activity of Crude Extracts from Marine Snails and Bivalves in the Southern Coast of Vietnam
Pham Xuan Ky, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Pham Thi Mien, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Le Ho Khanh Hy, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Dao Viet Ha, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Nguyen Phuong Anh, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Doan Thi Thiet, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Phan Bao Vy, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Ho Van The, Institute of Oceanography, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Nha Trang, Khanh Hoa, Vietnam
Received: Feb. 12, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 14, 2019;       Published: Apr. 10, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20190701.13      View  13      Downloads  7
Abstract
The primary antibacterial activity of methanol and chloroform crude extracts from marine snails and bivalves was assessed by using the agar diffusion technique against four bacterial strains. Active methanol extracts were then characterized using TLC, SDS-PAGE and FTIR. Methanol extracts from 5 snail species and 8 extracts from 12 bivalve species possessed the ability to inhibit Bacillus subtilis. Methanol extracts from 3 snail species Tectus conus, Maninella alounia and Trochus maculatus inhibited Escheria coli and those from 4 snail species Cerithium chinatum, Maninella alounia, Tectus pyramis, Trochus maculatus and the bivalve species Pinna bicolor exhibited activity against Serratia marcescens. Chloroform extracts from 7 snail species and those from 7 bivalve species showed inhibition on Bacillus subtilis. Only chloroform extract from the bivalve Chama cf dunkeri was active on Salmonella typhimur and that from the snail Trochus maculatus and bivalve Lopha cristagali inhibited Escheria coli. TLC and FTIR analysis of active methanol extracts showed the presence of amino acids, peptides and proteins. SDS-PAGE of those extracts also revealed proteins with a molecular weight range between 10 and 28 kDa. The obtained results indicate the potential antimicrobial compounds that could be explored in snail and bivalve in Vietnam.
Keywords
Snail, Bivalve, Crude Extracts, Antibacterial Activity, TLC, FTIR, SDS-PAGE
To cite this article
Pham Xuan Ky, Pham Thi Mien, Le Ho Khanh Hy, Dao Viet Ha, Nguyen Phuong Anh, Doan Thi Thiet, Phan Bao Vy, Ho Van The, Investigation of Antibacterial Activity of Crude Extracts from Marine Snails and Bivalves in the Southern Coast of Vietnam, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 7, No. 1, 2019, pp. 10-15. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20190701.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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