Volume 8, Issue 2, April 2020, Page: 25-32
Conventional and Molecular Diagnostic Tests for the Detection of Bacterial Pathogen in Burn Wound and Antimicrobial Properties of Some Medicinal Plants
Nasir Hassan Wagini, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Amina Lema Rafukka, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Aliyu Musa Yusuf, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Sani Muhd Gidado, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Samaila Abubakar, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Mudassiru Badamasi, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Abubakar Mannir Darma, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Taofiq Ademola Babatunde, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Abubakar Bello, Department of Biology, Faculty of Natural and Applied Sciences, Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina, Nigeria
Murtala Yusuf, Department of Biology, College of Natural and Applied Sciences, Alqalam University, Katsina, Nigeria
Jibrin Naka Keta, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kebbi State University of Science and Technology, Aliero, Kebbi, Nigeria
Lawan Buba Amshi, Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Yobe State University, Damaturu, Nigeria
Hussaina Usman Babba, Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Federal University, Dutsin-ma, Katsina, Nigeria
Received: Jan. 5, 2020;       Accepted: Jan. 15, 2020;       Published: Mar. 24, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20200802.11      View  144      Downloads  90
Abstract
This research aims to compare bacterial pathogens in different categories of burn wounds and evaluate the specificity and sensitivity of conventional and molecular diagnostics techniques in the detection of bacterial pathogens in burn wounds. This research project also tends to evaluate the potential antimicrobial activity of natural product by using Vachellia nilotica and Prosopis africana plant extracts. Burn wounds synovial fluid was collected from 50 patients each from three categories of burn wound over a period of 14 months. Samples were subjected to conventional and molecular diagnosis for the screening of the bacterial pathogens. Antibacterial properties of the plants extracts were tested using disc diffusion technique. Of the 50 samples, P. aeruginosa were isolated from 7 (14%), 12 (24%) and 17 (34%) samples of first, second and third degree of burn wounds respectively and were considered both positive for P. aeruginosa infection. However, Staphylococcus aureus was isolated only in the third degree from 4 out of 50 samples and was considered to be negative from first and second degree. Coliform (except E. coli) were absent from first degree but present in both second and third degrees (4 and 6) respectively. Gram stain can be considered as a rapid test but solely depend on the microbiological culture test, likewise majority of the biochemical test such as oxidase and API 20E tests. It was discovered that there is highest sensitivity of PCR over culture and or biochemical tests in the detection of P. aeruginosa from burn wound patients while some found no difference or even lower sensitivity in PCR assay. The result shows relatively antibacterial properties of both plant extracts against P. aeruginosa. It is concluded that P. aeruginosa is the most prevailing bacterial pathogen in burn wound and these plants extracts are active against the pathogen. Finally, a research to isolate and test individual chemical compounds responsible for the antibacterial properties from these plants is highly recommended.
Keywords
Conventional, Molecular, Antibacteria and Wound
To cite this article
Nasir Hassan Wagini, Amina Lema Rafukka, Aliyu Musa Yusuf, Sani Muhd Gidado, Samaila Abubakar, Mudassiru Badamasi, Abubakar Mannir Darma, Taofiq Ademola Babatunde, Abubakar Bello, Murtala Yusuf, Jibrin Naka Keta, Lawan Buba Amshi, Hussaina Usman Babba, Conventional and Molecular Diagnostic Tests for the Detection of Bacterial Pathogen in Burn Wound and Antimicrobial Properties of Some Medicinal Plants, American Journal of Biomedical and Life Sciences. Vol. 8, No. 2, 2020, pp. 25-32. doi: 10.11648/j.ajbls.20200802.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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